National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America

:: NAVTA News ::

Obesity Prevention Day

October 8, 2014 According to last year’s survey by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, an estimated 57.6 percent of cats and 52.6 percent of dogs in the U.S. are considered overweight or obese. In addition to a decreased life-expectancy, animals that are ove
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APOP 2014 Pet Obesity Study

September 15, 2014 The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) is collaborating with veterinarians across the United States to conduct its eighth annual National Pet Obesity Awareness Day study that aims to quantify the extent of obesity prevalence in dogs and cats th
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:: Upcoming Events ::

Date: October 23, 2014
Biking, Hiking, Wine Tasting and CE in Sunny Santa Barbara:
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Date: October 25, 2014
WVC- On The Road
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Date: November 1, 2014
ON DEMAND WEBINAR: Detailed 5 Part Simple and Surgical Extraction Series in the Dog & Cat
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Credentialing

Each state has different requirements for credentialing veterinary technicians.

Visit www.aavsb.org for more information on requirements and contact information for each state organization.


Credentials – The current terminology recognized by decree of both NAVTA and the AVMA is "Veterinary Technician". Whether you are an LVT, RVT or CVT the term used is mandated by the technician’s state of residence. Here are some definitions to help understand why all three terms are in use.


Certification– is the recognition by the private sector of voluntarily achieved standards. Certification is usually bestowed by a private sector, nonprofit, professional association or independent board upon those members who achieve specified standards. Certification is therefore distinguished from licensure because it is generally non-governmental and voluntary. Confusion can result when the title "certified" is used for a licensed profession, such as Certified Public Accountant. Many CVTs in the U.S. are recognized by government agencies, such as boards of veterinary medical examiners, which also adds to the confusion.


Registration– refers to the keeping of lists of practitioners by a governmental agency. It can be equivalent to licensure but may also be distinguished from licensure in that criteria for registration may not exist, and registration may not be required for practice.


Licensure/Licensing– is understood as the permission to do something as given by an authority, with the implication that one would not be permitted to do this thing without permission. To be licensed is more than a statement of qualification, as certification is. It is a statement of qualification, and it is the right to do a thing otherwise not permitted by a given authority. Both certification and licensure, however, carry the connotation of trust, belief and confidence; for without these attributes, the certification or the license would have little worth.


Multiple titles can be very confusing for the public. In order to simplify this, we recommend the use of the term credentialed Veterinary Technician. We use the word credential not only to denote licensure and certification, but also to connote an affective element inherent in these terms.